Three Poems

(from: Salt of Almonds)

 

Sharon Morris


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

aloe                                                                                                                                           

 

 

blasted from grey-

green leaves

like an epiphany,

the scroll of your cello,

hooks and eyes,

or a hat stand

for your blue hat

                                                                                 

the bright green pads

of the American aloe

(agave Americana)

signify

a kind of gaiety

sparse to the desert;

I hear that song

how high is the sky?

and I want to catch you,

you holding

the bare branch of aloe

as a part of your arm...

a saeta...

an arrow

 

  

saeta:  a musical prayer sung in Seville during Holy week, an offering, literally an arrow.

 

 

 

 

so the rose                                                                                                               

 

  

allotted a fistful

of babies,

sprigs locked

into the ground,

new sisal (agave

sisilana) stays

to the shifting dunes

of Playa del Lunes

punctuate

our line of sight:

racing against shadow

camera ready

to seize

the silhouette

I step back

the point of its leaf

like a dagger

punctures my leg:

I look up

and see a crown

of thorns

 

 

  

 

 

bee-eater

 

 

a bee-eater,

harlequin plumage, bright

blue and grassy green

with a yellow rump, 

                                                                                                                           

a liquid quilp in the throat,

this cousin of the king-

fisher,

wings of an angel

pointed as knives,

brings the cut

into paradise an epistle

from the gods

 

we see it

every time we stop

on the way to La Polacra,

fluttering

above the field

of stones

that abuts

the stand of palm trees;

the sea beyond  lapis

lazuli that calls us
with the strength

of a mirage, or,

as you following

the aloe

the way

of all devotional art

 

 

 

 

 

 


Kater Murr's Press, Piraeus Series, 2004. 
Poems and image copyright Sharon Morris, 2004.